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20121128
20121206
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
. back to you. >> mike, thank you. macarthur accused police are trying to destroy his civil rights. police have declined to comment about the case. >>> the baltimore woman accused of killing her child, is out of the hospital and is being held without bail tonight. mary is live in the newsroom with the latest on this. >> nicole fitzgerald is facing abuse charges in the death of 2- year-old paris. you can see the wound she inflicted on herself attempting to cut her throat. when officers arrived at her home, they found a 32-year-old holding a knife. they found her son dead from multiple stab wounds. fitzgerald is also charged with assault and reckless endangerment. denise? >> the little boy's aunt and uncle say fitzgerald has been dealing with health problems. >>> a man is arrested after going off an embankment. just after noon today. the car went off winter's run road. coming to a stop. rescue crews pulled a 21-year- old man from the car and he was flown to shock trauma. his condition is unknown at this point. >>> another troubling incident tonigh
intensely about it, where will put everything on the line to make it happen. in the civil rights era, when we had those celebrated filibusters, they were not partisan in the sense. they were factional. the fact is the filibuster's done by southern democratic senators to oppose civil rights or voting rights in a deflation were opposed by republicans, just as they were by non- southern democrats. the fact is that civil rights and legislation and overcoming this filibuster's and being enacted which at least as much to the credit and responsibility of everett dirksen, the minority leader, as to lyndon johnson. what we have seen is a regular use of the filibuster now as a partisan tool, and not just a group of members of the party, but the entire party has fashioned by the minority leader. the second is the use of the filibuster routinely, not on issues of great national significance, and not simply on those issues where the majority leader kills the amendment tree, but on issues and nominations which ultimately pass unanimously or near it unanimously. keep in mind on nominations, where holds w
to negotiate. we passed the civil rights bill. there was, if you will, a precedent in terms of cooperation and climate. as the representative point out, later on that would manifest itself in what was really an unprecedented interaction between the white house and congress on dealing with the invasion to kuwait and trying to pull together a unified perspective. i think the climate -- it was not accidental. we worked awfully hard in order to maintain that. i certainly feel that the key to it was the fact that tom foley and president bush had been members of congress to gather. they had developed a personal relationship. other members of congress, including dave and others, had been there. the president was in the house -- there were personal relationships that we, frankly, in the nicest sense of the word, exploited as much as possible in order to maintain the comedy of the process. one more point, since we were commenting on him -- he was really in my opinion from at least our perspective the heart and soul of the details of this process. barry and others have talked about the importance of
of civilization. it's stored right here. smiles make more smiles. when the chocolate is hershey's. life is delicious. >> jennifer: injureyou're back inside "the war room." i'm jennifer granholm. we have movies that matter series. i'll tell but a movie that is causing a buzz. it's called "chasing ice"." >> i never imagined you could sees glaciers disappearing in such a short time. the initial goal was to put out 25 cameras for three years. shoot every hour as long as it was daylight to show you how the landlandscape was changing. >> the landscape is gone and it may never be seen again in the history of civilization, and its stored right here. >> jennifer: the photographer is james balog and "chasing ice" is a wake-up call to the world that we need to get serious about chime change. he's joining us from denver. thanks for joining us. >> hello jennifer, great to join you. before you started making this movie in you 2005, you said that you were skeptical of chime change. has your point of view changed? >> honestly it was more like 20, 25 years ago when i thought that this whole story was ab
was not willing. what she is doing and i will say this because it needs to be said, i came out of the civil right movement and i was involved in the election of the first black mayors across america, chicago, philadelphia, atlanta, a lost places. for the congressional democrats to go out there and to attack her as racist and an attack on women, when are we going to reach a place in politics when where you lie, which she did, and you screw up, you are held accountable regardless of race and gender. this is, this victimization stuff is backfiring i am afraid and it is all the cards she think she has and she is running the meeting and was arrogant. >> it comes from the top down, since the president was re-elected, we saw the thing we talked about in the first segment with him trying to take the power away to raise the debt debt. that is unbelievable. and i think he things he can have anyone he wants and stick it down the senator's throats. >>gregg: do you think he will nominate her? >> i don't think he can. he will have to go of necessity, to john kerry who the republicans will confirm in a second a
for oscar grants civil rights case will be in court today. there will be arguing the rulings against johannes mehserle and the other two officers involved leading to oscar grants killing should not be overturned. in may of 2011 it was ruled that bart could not be held responsible for the 2009 shooting death. patel ruled that most of the issues in the $50 million federal lawsuit on behalf of grass family against current and former birds police officer should be decided by a jury at a trial. >> president obama and republicans appear to be playing a game of political chicken right now. the president put out a proposal for 1.6 trillion dollars in higher taxes over several years. and 200 billion in new spending to is that stimulate the economy. treasury secretary jim guy near saying republicans do not have a plan. as far as where we are with the fiscal cliff negotiations right now, we are nowhere. >> said in an moderations tend to be smaller if the president is having a second one. this coming january's inauguration for president obama will follow the same trend. there'll be close to 800,
of civilization, and its stored right here. >> jennifer: the photographer is james balog and "chasing ice" is a wake-up call to the world that we need to get serious about chime change. he's joining us from denver. thanks for joining us. >> hello jennifer, great to join you. before you started making this movie in you 2005, you said that you were skeptical of chime change. has your point of view changed? >> honestly it was more like 20, 25 years ago when i thought that this whole story was about computer modeling, which at the time was relatively primitive. i was wrong about that. the real story was about--the real evidence had-held in the ice cores up to antarctica to to arctic. once i took time to stop and understand the empirical evosed to my my misconceptions. i started this in the late 90s but it wasn't until 2005 when the ice work started get going that i got locked into the trajectory that became the movie and ice survey. >> jennifer: you're in position to provide other i am empirical evidence, which is what your film is about. what is happening with the film? do you think it's ch
judiciary, property law and human rights law, trying to expand civil society in ways that will make china flourish in the future. we are lucky to have you. three clique points i want to make before we move on, before we hear from professor alford, cohen and gewirtz. it is important to note that in the cycles of the u.s./china relationship we are entering an extraordinarily interesting period. i can't remember a time in recent history where we have had a president in an election but roughly coincided exactly with the leadership change in beijing. so what have we seen in beijing? in recent weeks, this very month. 2,000 delegates visiting beijing, putting together a slate of 370 committee members, chopping off 25 members of the politburo and some agreement around not 9 but 7 members of the standing committee of the politburo which i would refer to or considered to be the board of directors if it will end a reelected president on this side which is to say we are going to begin the new year with a clean slate and that ability which is so unusual in the u.s./china relationship to start fresh an
and opportunities for all. equality before the law and civil rights. that is a psychic -- a society in which i want to live and my children to be able to live in of. there is no guarantee we will live happily ever after. the era of globalization -- we need to cooperate more than ever to defend our democracy. and our society. we cannot take what has been achieved for granted. we need to continue fighting for it on a daily basis. other parts of the world are developing. i mentioned at the beginning of my speech that in the g-20 and with its creation, it took the necessary consequence to involved in emerging regions of the world and the political system to rule the world but those parts of the world we consider today that the emerging countries are not sharing our values. the lowest salary, the lowest respect for individual rights, the los respect for freedom of speech, for example by closing the internet. it the lowest standard of what the are considering you in the united states in europe as our basic values and our standards representing our basic values. the best means to compete economically agai
, in syria's civil war. what happened? >> that's right, wolf. syrian activists say at least 45 people were killed in two car bombings outside the capital of damascus. that city has been a sanctuary for pro-regime forced to flee their homes. the rebels have claimed to down three fighter jets in the past 24 hours. we'll speak with cnn's arwa damon from northern syria later this hour. a federal judge is ordering tobacco companies to publicly admit they deceived americans about the dangers of smoking. the court ruled big tobacco should print on the box and advertisements. it's not clear if tobacco companies will appeal this decision. and the self-described king of motivation has died at the age of 86 years old. zig ziglar best known for his seminars and more than two dozen books on salesmanship. he died in dallas after getting pneumonia. he had quite an influence. he had 30 books or so over the course of his life. >> quite a following. thanks very much, lisa, for that. >>> republican raise eyebrows when he said he might break the anti-tax pledge. that statement could also draw him into getting
: right now new violence in syria's civil war. state media there saying 29 students and a teacher were killed when a mortar slammed into a school outside damascus. and we have this. new amateur video said to be showing a government warplane on a bombing run over a damascus suburb. it is home to many rebels and their supporters. we can not confirm the authenticity of that video but we have no reasondoubt it e. conor powell live from jerusalem. >> reporter: jon, it appears the war in syria is entering a new phase. in recent days and weeks the syrian government faced a real military setback as rebels begin to advance towards damascus. that is one of the reason we've seen intense fighting around damascus and more and more of the syrian jets making bombing runs trying to attack the syrian opposition groups. the fear if the syrian government, the assad regime feels their grip is beginning to loosen and slip away that they will turn to chemical weapons. there is evidence according to u.s. around national intelligence officials say that the assad regime is beginning to prepare their chemical a
with more on her legal moves. >> that's right. staff sergeant jennifer hunt is suing the department of defense, as the civil affairs specialist in the army affairs. hunt has deployed to iraq and afghanistan, even earned a purple heart. hunt says the policy bang women from direct ground missions is illegal. the department of defense says more than 14,000 jobs previously closed. two women have opened up to them this year. denise? >> all right. thank you, kai. hunt says this lawsuit isn't calling for a certain number of combat positions to be open to women. but instead to give women an equal opportunity to compete for the jobs. >>> in wjz's healthwatch, a new study could change the standard of care in breast cancer treatment. new research suggests women should take tamoxifen for 10 years. twice as long as the current five-year recommendation. researchers at the university of oxford found breast cancer patients who took the drug longer, were less likely to die, and less likely to have their cancer come back. >>> well, a former student at frostbur
to pay for the clean-up. right? >> that's right. they set aside a $20 billion fund voluntarily to compensate victims. there is also going to be additional penalties as part of civil violations of the clean water act, estimated to be 21 billion. >> that's probably going to be handed down in the next few months. this is just to settle criminal charges for the company pled guilty to 14 criminal guilty pleas, 11 counts 50 seaman's manslaughter, a criminal violation of the clean water act, a migratory bird act and for obstruction of justice, for submitting false information to the congressional investigation during the summer of 2010. >> the 20 billion clean-up fund the 21mul billion. >> for the clean water. >> billion? 41? so this criminal fine was? >> four and a half 689. >> >>. >> so $50,000,000,000. >> the company said aside all of that money. they had been selling off assets and they've got a huge cash reserve and the 20 billion for clean up that's in the fund. >> they can absorb this and stay in business? >> absolutely. >> that's been their plan.
is an escalation in the streets but is it across broader cairo society? there have been calls for civil disobedience and we see evidence of that with some newspapers not publishing and radio stations not broadcasting tomorrow but you do not see it broadly across egypt. this is substantial. it looks for right now as your reporter pointed out, it look like the referendum is going through. >>shepard: do you get the sense that president morsi will retreat? >>guest: the reporting suggests he is moving ahead and he feels he has enough support in the muslim brotherhood and he has, now, a draft constitution, and that enough judges will be there to sanctify this referendum and they can codify the gains the muslim brotherhood made. the opposition is concerned that they had their first election and their last election and there will be a consolidation by the muslim brotherhood it will impede liberty. >>shepard: the reading of the constitution suggests that they are -- their democracy will only last a few days but this is a new dictatorship from the constitution. >>guest: there are limitations on f
worried about president morici sweeping it. that is more what the protests are about right now. ashley: what is the biggest danger, that this just dissolves into full-blown civil unrest? >> well, i think, even a bigger danger is the creeping of egyptian society. people are quite worried about it at this moment. it will actually prevent voters being informed on what is and isn't. ashley: expansion of powers for president morsi, kind of just voted himself into this position. is there anything that can be done about this? >> what the muslim brotherhood claims is that the last year and a half has been bad for society and bad for the economy. they need to get to this transition phase. get the constitution approved and get the country back to business. there are a lot of egyptian, so little social trust there right now. people are really fearful right now. ashley: this puts the u.s. in a bit of a difficult situation. there is a lot of money that comes to the united states to help the egyptian military. here we are, again, what does the u.s. do in this situation? it has to be a concern. >> ab
to the hospital. we are live at the breaking news desk. the new nears about chemical weapons in the civil war rocking syria, why the u.s. and the international community should be concerned. we'll go in-depth with ambassador bolton. jenna: right now we are learning about a serious health problem for a former child star, rick folbaum is live at the breaking news news desk with more. >> reporter: you don't usually hear about healthy 20 somethings having strokes. that's what doctors say happened to frankly m u.n. is. he was riding his motorcycle in phoenix when he lost vision in one eye. friends, including his fiancee got worried when he was acting very strangely. turns out he was having a mini stroke. here he is on "good morning america." >> something wasn't right. i knew i did not feel right. coy -pbt say words. couldn't say words. i thought i was saying them. my fiancee was looking at me like i was speaking a foreign language. maybe i had a bad headache, i don't know. i've never had a sip of alcohol in my life, i've never had any drugs, i've never even smoked a cigarette. i can't get a deep b
responsible for paying civil penalties. bill: late last night if you missed this, the senate voted to keep the terror suspects at gitmo right where they are. they will not come here if the senate has its way. the measure will block the transfer of detainees to u.s. soil. a day of at report identified facilities in the u.s. believed to be capable housing them. senators approved the measure, 54-41. general yak keen, jack keane, is flies to see you again. melissa: good morning, bill. bill: does this mean gitmo does not close not even in a second term or does the president come and veto this? melissa: there i think will be pressure to try to close it which doesn't make a lot of sense to me. we have enemy combatants in there as a result of a war. the frustration is the war has gone on for a long time and therefore we should do something about these detainees. we're not making the choice for the war going on a long time. the al qaeda and affiliates are making that choice. they just burned down our consulate and killed our ambassador and forced close sure of a cia base. they're protracking the wa
reid's theory. right now, if you look at the voting history of the same there is a pro-gun majority in the senate. if subject to civil majority but would have a chance of passing to another thing that is very, very important is getting rid of senate majority leader harry reid and the future majority centers. their needs new point of order to get rid of this. reid's tactic about 60 times, far more than its predecessors all combined. it is something that would allow all members of the senate to actually participate in this deliberative process, to offer amendments. and if you were to pass this, it would be something that would be great to pass with 67 votes shutting down the debate. you might not have -- old problem of the let's call serial filibusters, it might actually go away if republicans were actually allowed to producer in the process. what we are seeing now is a construction of the minority's rights, the minority party's rights and individual's rights by trying to get rid of the motions to proceed, during the bills by enforcing the so-called talking filibusters. if you can try
of the house? >> all right. >> all right. you guys are -- were you okay in the green room? nobody separated you two, did they? it was a civil? >> no, we get along. >> in the green room -- >> any bagels in there for you guys? >> no, we don't eat bagels. >> guys on monday got bagels. >> the bagels were there? >> it's all good. >> i judge what we think -- >> i'm jewish, when i walk into a room, i immediately know if there are bagels. >> did you get a tree? >> a holiday tree? >> yeah. >> you do? >> my wife says no, they're too messy. >> the christmas tree is the celebration of saturn, anybody could have a christmas tree. >> did you get a festivus pole? >> now you're talking. >> this is a family show. >> it's early. >> thank you very much, dan. we appreciate it. chris is sticking around. up next, we are half way through the holiday shopping season. we're going to look at the winners and losers after this. >>> and 7:40 eastern time, steven ross, looking to revitalize a major area of new york. we're going to talk business and football when he joins us in a few minutes. drum and flute" can look who's b
to be a civil war between the view of people like steve and the view of some on the hard right. and i thought up here i'm not going to say a challenging thing about governor romney or pour snalt any wounds. but a few hours ago governor romney did a conference call to thank some of his donors. and he said that the reason he lost was that the president had given gifts, his word gifts to young people in the form of student loans and student loan repayment process. gifts to the latino policy by saying dream act kids would not be deported over the coming years. gifts of healthcare. so that says fundamental misreading about what happened. i'll pour more salt in the wound. paul ryan said the reason we won is because we did tpwhell you shallen areas. we won his hometown by 24 points and he lost it by ten and it's not an you shallen area. so it's disturbing within eighty days there is that think about that gift to young people, latinos. gifts of contraception to women. so if that's your diagnosis, and it actually has eerie echoes of the 47%. so to the think of soul searching. governor romney is going off
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)